TSA Requirements

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TSA Requirements 2017-04-12T10:37:25+00:00

 

TSA Requirements

 

Due to the events of September 11th 2001, the T.S.A. now requires the following information from students BEFORE flight training can begin.

If you are a U.S. Citizen, item #2 below (proof of citizenship) applies to you. Please bring these documents with you.

U.S. Citizens

Determine Applicability. The requirements for determining citizenship status for any student, whether U.S. or alien, applies only to flight training toward a recreational pilot, sport pilot, or private pilot certificate; instrument rating; or multiengine rating.

Proof of Citizenship. Evidence of U.S. citizenship must be shown by ONE of the following:

  • Valid, unexpired U.S. passport.
  • Original birth certificate of the United States, American Samoa, or Swains Island, and government-issued picture ID.
  • Original certification of birth abroad with raised seal (Form FS-545 or DS-1350) and government-issued picture ID.
  • Original certificate of U.S. citizenship with raised seal (Form N-560 or N-561), or a Certificate of Repatriation (Form N-581), and government-issued picture ID.
  • Original U.S. Naturalization Certificate with raised seal (Form N-550 or N-570) and a government issued picture ID.
  • Logbook or Record-keeping Requirements. An instructor must keep a copy of the documents for five years that are used to prove citizenship or make an endorsement in both the instructor’s
  • logbook, or other record used by the instructor to record flight student endorsements, and the student’s logbook with the following:

“I certify that

[insert student’s name] has presented me a [insert type of document presented, such as a U.S. birth certificate or U.S. passport, and the relevant control or sequential number on the document, if any] establishing that [he or she] is a U.S. citizen or national in accordance with 49 CFR 1552.3(h). [Insert date and instructor’s signature and CFI number.]”

 

All of our Staff undergoes Security Awareness Training

According to the TSA rule, each flight school employee or independent instructor must receive recurrent security awareness training every 12 months from the month of their initial training. A recent TSA exemption from 49 CFR 1552.23(d)(1) allows all flight training providers (flight schools and independent CFIs) to receive their recurrent security awareness training up to 1 calendar month before and 1 calendar month after the month that the individual’s recurrent security awareness training course is due. This exemption applies only to the requirements for recurrent security awareness training, not the initial security awareness training.

The purpose of the TSA recurrent security awareness training is to make flight schools, instructors, and flight school employees aware of security-related incidents, measures, and procedures that affect their local airport and flight school. This means they should be aware of any new security measures or procedures, new threats posed by or incidents involving general aviation aircraft, and any new guidelines or recommendations concerning the security of general aviation aircraft, airports, or flight schools.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

 

Are introductory or “discovery” flights exempt from the requirements of the TSA rule?

Yes. TSA has stated through correspondence with AOPA that introductory or “discovery” flights are exempt from the requirements of the TSA rule.

 

What is the definition of flight training as it pertains to this rule for the purposes of needing to undergo citizenship verification?

The TSA has further interpreted the definition of “flight training” for aircraft with a maximum certificated takeoff weight of 12,500 pounds or less to only apply to training for a recreational pilot, sport pilot, or private pilot certificate; multiengine rating (at any certificate level — i.e., does not apply to MEI); or instrument rating (does not include recurrent training).

 

Do the requirements for citizenship verification apply for flight reviews, aircraft checkouts, or instrument proficiency checks?

No, TSA has interpreted the definition of “recurrent training” to NOT include any flight review, proficiency check, or other check required by 14 CFR § 61.57 or § 61.58 whose purpose is to review rules, maneuvers, or procedures, or to demonstrate a pilot’s existing skills. The TSA has further interpreted the definition of “flight training” for aircraft with a maximum certificated takeoff weight of 12,500 pounds or less to only apply to training for a recreational pilot, sport pilot, or private pilot certificate; multiengine rating (at any certificate level — i.e., does not apply to MEI); or instrument rating (does not include recurrent training).

 

 

 

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